Kids-play with Scale

So awkwardly enough, I’ve had ‘Scale’ in my to-write-about file for over a month now and as I indicated in this post earlier this week, one of my favorite ways to play with scale is to include a very large sized print in a small space.  Low and behold, this fantastic space has been all over the shelter blogs recently. The large scale animal wall paper is whimsical on its own, but taken to an even larger extreme, the wall paper becomes a statement.

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While playing with scale sometimes means literally taking something and messing with its natural proportions, it can also refer to the symmetry of all of the items in a space together.  For instance, in the vignette below, every piece is generally on the same scale, and when paired with the wainscoting which serves to draw the eye downward, the scale of the pieces together as a whole create a more cozy nook.

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But check it out again when we pan out to see the whole room…

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Turns out that table isn’t a dresser, it’s a night stand!  And the chair is a kids chair!!  But because within the context of the original photo everything was the same scale, our eyes and minds fooled us into thinking they were larger pieces.

This space (and correct me if I’m wrong..but are those some FLOR tiles I spy?) is a beautiful example of how consistent scale in a room can truly create harmony.  Everything from the crib, to the leggy chair, stool and dresser combine to fill the space with symmetry in a cheery, cohesive way.

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Of course, scale can literally be represented in designing spaces intentionally for children.  This reading nook uses two slender bookcases that offset the junior-sized chair beautifully.

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Perhaps the most functional purpose of scale in children’s design can be credited to the Montessori method where there is a heavy suggestion of scaling everything a child will use to their size…from the bed to the bookcases to the desk and mirror.  This space from SewLiberated is the quintessential study in scale for children’s rooms.

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Lastly, before we leave the subject of scale, I have these two examples of home organization areas.  Both are designed with kids in mind, one on a grand scale…

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…the other on a smaller scale.

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Both are functional.  Both are whimsical. Both make a statement.  Both are beautiful.  Which just goes to prove that you can do anything with scale so long as your form and function are balanced.

 

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